health

Think Thin: Not Diet but Behavior

“Thin behavior” has fascinated me for years. I just don’t get it. I don’t mean the kind of behavior where skinny kids squeezed through fence slats in the alley, or where my teen-aged friends stretched thin, nubile bodies on the beach at Shady Oak Lake as I huddled on my towel.

Nope.

I mean the eating kind of thin behaviors:

  • Behaviors like choosing a bowl of vegetable soup over clam chowder.
  • Behaviors like preferring a chef’s salad over a burger and fries, or grilled fish rather than steak.
Norwegian lunch
A fabulous yet low-calorie meal: eggs, tomatoes and smoked salmon over a slice of whole-grain toast with lettuce. YUM!
  • Behaviors like leaving food on your plate (not just the onions you’ve picked out of your salad).
  • Behaviors like nibbling one Rice Krispy bar for a half hour (I actually witnessed this).
  • Behaviors like choosing small portions of only three things at a potluck. (I take small portions, but I end up with twenty heaped on my plate.)
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A slice of toast with Vegemite should curb your hunger. And how about a banana?

 

I’m thin-behavior challenged. Why me?

It all began in my youth. I grew up in the fifties when one of my favorite TV programs was the “Ding-Dong School” which featured the “Do-Bee” song: “Do be a plate cleaner. Don’t be a food shirker.” I took it to heart.

Another influence that pushed me to eat was Mom’s admonition when I left food on my plate. “Think of the hungry children in China.” Like any self-respecting child, I knew better than to say they were welcome to it, although I would have happily wrapped my Swedish meatballs and shipped them to those unfortunates.

Another obstacle to thin behavior was “No dessert until you eat up.” The logic in that escapes me. Eat a lot, then you can eat more. I learned it well, though. I eat a lot, then I have more.

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Healthy eating behaviors start young, as my sweet great-niece and nephew demonstrate. They love fruit and yogurt.

The main reason I’m thin-behavior challenged, though, is that I love food. Lots of it. I love snickerdoodle cookies—hard to stop before twelve. I have a good friend who is aghast if she indulges in a third cookie. I’m sure she’s never eaten a whole bag. That’s why I don’t bake.

One slice of pizza is just a teaser, and I’m nearly certain that heaven is lined with camembert and brie.

So what can you do?

I used to go on crash diets and fast for days, neither of which was wise or healthy. Finally, in desperation, I joined Weight Watchers, which educated me about changing my attitudes and behaviors rather than starving myself. It changed my life. I went from a binge eater to a sensible one. I revere thin behaviors. I must admit they don’t come naturally, but I’m doing better all the time. These are some of the behaviors that help me:

  • I guzzle a glass of water every time I migrate to the kitchen. (It fills me up and deters me from mindless snacking.) That water glass is the first thing I see, waiting by the sink. I try to down least six glasses of water in each day.
  • I avoid red-light foods (foods I can’t resist), which for me are cheese and crackers, especially in the late afternoon. I know some people can’t resist sweets.

 

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Sometimes you have to indulge in a sweet–like this scrumptious Christmas pavlova.
  • I plant myself far from the appetizer table at gatherings once I’ve tasted a few items.
  • I avoid shopping on an empty stomach. Morning works best for me.
  • I use rewards. I don’t allow myself a cup of morning coffee until I’ve done 20 minutes of stretches and exercises.
  • I exercise with friends daily, and when that’s not possible, I listen to audio books while I walk, bike, or hike.
  • Sometimes I treat myself to a long bath when I’m feeling out of control (late afternoon for me). Food doesn’t go in the bathroom, at least not at my house.
  • When I’m hankering for a treat it helps to go brush my teeth. It quells my appetite. Dill pickles and candied ginger work, too.
  • I’m trying to eat five servings of fruit and veggies every day, which continues to be a challenge.
abundance agriculture bananas batch

 

I still love food, and I still lose control sometimes, but these basic behavior changes have made it much easier for me to control my eating, and that helps me feel more in control of every other aspect of my life. 

Think BEHAVIOR!

Jake and a stick
Our pal Jake demonstrates the lowest fat kind of diet, and he’s clearly embarrassed about it. Lots of fiber, though.

 

This article first appeared on Sixty and Me:

http://sixtyandme.com/9-behavior-patterns-of-healthy-senior-weight-loss-forget-diets-think-behavior/

health, life in general, travel

SEVEN TIPS FOR SOLO TRAVEL

by Ann Marie Mershon

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I took this selfie on a mountaintop overlooking Bodø after a gorgeous solo hike.

Many of us over 60 are single or have husbands uninterested in touring the planet. Is that any reason to avoid the trips we yearn for?

I lived overseas (alone) for seven years, and though I preferred traveling with friends, I spent a week in Malta by myself and another one alone in Thailand. I managed, but I learned some things along the way. At first I sat with a book at dinner and ate other meals in my room, but once I reached out just a bit, I found people were friendly and welcoming. I need connections.

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Street performers in Bangkok, Thailand

1. Tell restauranteurs that you’re alone and would appreciate being seated with another party. 

If that’s not an option, seat yourself near someone who is alone or people who look friendly. Why not?

Last month my husband suffered a back injury and had to wave me off for two weeks in Norway without him. I would have cancelled the trip if it hadn’t been for a huge family reunion in the fishing village where my grandfather grew up. Determined to make the most of things, on my first night in Bodø I wheedled my way into a busy seafood restaurant and was seated beside a couple from Lilljehammer. It took me a minute to engage them, and they turned out to be charming as well as informative, giving me ideas for activities in the coming weeks.

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I indulged in this delicious solo lunch at the Underhuset Restaurant in Sakrisoy, Norway. 

2. If breakfast is provided at your hotel, strike up a conversation as you stand in line and ask if they’d mind if you join them at their table. Few people would refuse.

Once your day begins, you have other options for making connections, or perhaps you’d prefer to tour on your own, which is great, too. I like going through museums by myself, but I prefer company at meals.

3. Stay in hostels or bed-and-breakfasts that offer time for socializing.

On my last night in Lofoten, Norway, I moved from my studio apartment to a hostel-type room, where I was pleased to chat with a young Australian woman. She happily joined me on a trip to a glassblower’s shop the next day. The drive was spectacular, and I enjoyed her company immensely, especially after five days by myself.

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This was my “cabin” in Chang Mai, Thailand, where I shared meals with other residents.

4. Plan at least one interesting activity each day.

Jerry and I had planned a kayak trip in the Lofotens for our second week in Norway. At the beginning of my solo week, I perused the tourist information books and chose one or two activities each day. I booked a studio apartment in Å (pronounced “Oh”), a town of about 50-60 residents. The Lofotens are spectacularly beautiful, with mountains jutting from the sea between adjacent fjords. Å featured two fishing museums,and I visited them on separate days, making sure I was included in guided English tours of the museums. It was fascinating to learn about the life my grandfather must have lived as a fisherman.

One day I arranged a kayak trip of the Reine Fjord, and my young guide Kaspar was an absolute delight. The two of us spent a fascinating four hours chatting and paddling some of the most breathtaking water on the planet.

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Nothing beats kayaking the Reinefjord with a charming young guide. Really.

5. Join group tours at museums and tourist sites, then engage others in conversation throughout each tour.

It might cost a little more for a spot with a tour guide, but you’ll learn a lot more and have the opportunity to connect with other English speakers. Of course, most Norwegians speak English, but they don’t tent to reach out to strangers. That was my job.

Another option is traveling on a tour, which offers you automatic companionship. I’ve sponsored a few tours of Turkey, and I was amazed at how close members of the group became after spending a few weeks touring and eating together.

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I met this friendly fellow on a tour of the Elephant Sanctuary near Chiang Mai, Thailand.

6. Engage shop owners in conversation.

Whenever I felt lonesome in Turkey, I’d find a carpet shop to wander into. Carpet dealers always offer a cup of tea or bottle of cold water as well as friendly conversation. Of course, I always looked at carpets, but I only bought one occasionally. I still treasure my relationships with Hussein Palyoğlu and Musa Başaran, who always seemed pleased to see me. Western cultures might not be quite as welcoming, yet most shopowners are eager to engage customers, and they can offer a wealth of information about the area. Who knows? You might even find the perfect souvenier or gift to bring home.

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One of the many delightful carpet dealers I’ve met over the years, this one in Cozumel.

7. Choose a safe bar or pub and enjoy a chat over a glass of wine or a beer.

Should you dare, you might also consider a stop into the hotel bar or a nearby pub, making sure you use good judgement and hang on to your purse. Though I’ve always found it difficult to step into a bar alone, it can be a good way to meet other solo travelers. It’s important to keep your wits about you and avoid being pulled into an uncomfortable situation, but it’s also great fun to chat with other travelers or locals about activities they’ve enjoyed or recommend.

Efes in Kalkan coffee shop

I grew fond of Efes beer while in Turkey, especially since their wine is, well, not as good.

8. Take a group tour that matches your age, interest, and activity level.

There’s a wide variety of tour organizations geared for people of different interests and activity levels. Some arrange cruises, others bus tours, and some offer high-energy active options. The first time I took a group to Turkey, I arranged it through Go Ahead Tours, an adult affiliate of EF Tours (an international student tour organization). We were a group of 24, and everyone fell in love with our intelligent, fun, and informative guide, Mehmet. There wasn’t enough physical activity on that tour for some of us, though that was the only complaint. This year I’ve organized an independent tour through Sojourn Turkey Tours, and we’re doing a similar tour with fewer people and more activity—lucky us!

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The fellow waving at me was our wonderful tour guide Mehmet, here at Ephesus in Turkey.

However you choose to connect with others while you travel, I wish you a fulfilling and interesting experience.

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sail. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

~ Mark Twain

 

This article (with different photos) originally appeared on Sixty and Me, a web site for women over sixty: http://sixtyandme.com/8-tips-for-staying-social-when-traveling-solo/

self-publishing, writing

Let me share my tale…

You must only to love them, Ann Marie Mershon, annmariemershon.com, https://www.amazon.com/You-must-only-love-them-ebook/dp/B01DFUGIEI
I’ll send you autographed copies, as many as you’d like!

 

I spent some fascinating (and challenging) years teaching in Turkey, and I’d love to share them with you, your friends, and your family. Contact me if you’d like copies, and I’ll send them off pronto. Write before December 15th, though, as I’ll be off on yet another adventure.

Of course, Amazon can send unsigned copies more quickly at full price: https://www.amazon.com/You-must-only-love-them-ebook/dp/B01DFUGIEI

Either way, I think you’ll enjoy the book. 5 stars on Amazon with 53 reviews. I’m amazed.

Shameless self-promotion, but what’s a writer to do?

Thanks!

Ann Marie

 

outdoor activities

A Cheer-me-up Time Trial: BWAM!

It was the brain child of Energizer Bunny Dan Bale, our neighbor, who cajoled his wife Lynette, my husband Jerry and me into “mounting” the Ride of the Century…well, Ride of the Year. Ride of the Month? O.K. Ride of the weekend. It was fun, though: the First Annual BWAM Time Trial (BWAM: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon). A good time was had by all.

BWAM: Ladysmith, WI, Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
BWAM Course Map

The race was held on Saturday, November 12th, and mother nature blessed us with sunshine and relatively warm weather along Wisconsin’s Flambeau River, at least during the race.

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Race Master Dan Bale explains the rules to contestants with the Flambeau River behind him.

Dan and Jerry had laid out a 2.5 mile course through the woods of their adjacent river properties (as well as the nearby college property), a course that included two bridges, a log across the path (with a rubber duckie and a sign reminding racers to “DUCK”), and a skeleton to warn racers of Heartbreak Ridge, a steep curving ridge near the end of the race. Racers completed two laps and were required to ring a bell as they raced by the start/finish line on their first lap as well as at the finish.

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Heidi poses with the skeleton before Heartbreak Ridge

Seventeen racers completed the course, three women and fourteen men. In the women’s race, with a daunting field of three racers, Lisa finished first, surpassing race organizer Lynette Anderson by nearly a minute. Jan turned in a good time until she realized she’d missed one of the loops in the course. Oh, well!

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
The Mighty Women Racers of BWAM!
BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Lynette reaches for the bell at the finish line.

Frank Lowry, a veritable mountain bike animal, took first overall. (Local Boy Makes Good!)

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Frank Lowry, Overall Winner

Jon Lane, a Lakeside Racer from Excelsior, did an endo and face plant at the first bridge yet still finished second overall. Amazing!

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Jon flies through the gate for a photo finish!

The only other mishap was Jerry’s reconditioned mountain bike, which unhinged its seat about a third of the way into the first lap. He limped in carrying the seat, then—undaunted—repaired it and headed out to finish a lap. There were a few mis-steps in the race as well. Jan and John Z. skipped a short loop on one of their laps, and Bruce rode an additional short loop on the college property. He saw Jerry come through and just followed him. Honesty prevailed, though, and disqualified racers still received their awards.

Race timer Ann Marie Mershon (too fearful of the risks of woodland racing to participate as the only Virgin Rider*) was assisted by friends Diane and Tom to produce meticulous records of race times. Kudos to the wonders of iPad technology, which recorded each lap to the hundredth of a second.

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Timer Ann Marie Mershon clearly took the race seriously (assistants Tom and Diane on the deck.
BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Best-Dressed Racer, Micah Wilkes, poses beside his father Jerry, who was oblivious of his impending disaster.

No expenses were spared on this event. In addition to extensive publicity (e-mail and phone calls at a cost of $0), nearly $14 were spent at the local thrift stores on bibs (fashioned from old pillowcases) and fabulous prizes for each participant, ranging from Shawn’s Whoopie Cushion to stuffed animals and beer mugs. The grand winner, Frank Lowry, went home with a giant zucchini that had a first prize trophy embedded in it. Actually, he didn’t go home with it—he left it behind, along with his red jacket. We’re all getting just a little older and a little more forgetful. Life goes on.

And then there was the FOOD! Oh, my—It doesn’t get better than this event. Ever.

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Shad passes Micah on the turn behind Jerry’s pasture.

 

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
Ted “Espresso” Siefkes flies past the skeleton toward Heartbreak Ridge on his fat bike.

In case you’re interested, here is a list of the official awards. Times are top secret.

WOMEN:

Lisa Siefkes:    1st Place, Women—stuffed Bear in the Woods
Lynette Anderson:    Got Skunked Award—stuffed skunk
Jan Paulsen:    Shaky Memory Award (for missing a loop)—book “Improve Your Memory”

MEN:
Frank Lowry:    1st Place overall (mountain bike)—giant zucchini with  imbedded trophy
Robert “Legs” Legler:    1st Place on a fat bike—Big Cahuna cigar and beer mug
John “JR” Lane:    Drown Your Sorrows Award (2nd place mountain bike)—beer glass
Shad “Diggit” Prinz:    Drown Your Sorrows Award (2nd place fat bike)—two beer mugs
Micah Wilkes:    Most Interesting Garb (tie-dyed t-shirt)—Hawaiian shirt
Josh Wilkes:    Turtle Award (raced on the heaviest fat bike in the race)—turtles, racing CD
Jerry Wilkes:    Biggest Whiner award (after his seat fell off)—a bottle of wine
Dan Bale:    Energizer Bunny Award—singing and dancing mechanical rabbit
Lake Marshall Bechtell III: Things Will Get Better (3rd place)—Pick Me Up pink water bottle
Bruce Larson: Most Lost Racer Award—orange hunting cap
Ted “Espresso” Siefkes: Miss Congeniality—cowboy mug and squirt gun
Steve “Silver” Knowlton: Happy Birthday Award—stuffed moose with a birthday hat
Shane Klein: Youngest Racer—Whoopie cushion
John Ziemer: Most Relaxed Racer—Pokey (Poker) Hat
Watch your inbox for information about next year’s race, which will be held on either September 16th or October 7th. Time will tell.

  *Virgin Rider: one who has ridden less that 10 times this season.

BWAM race, Ladysmith, Wisconsin: Bale, Wilkes, Anderson, Mershon
After their post-race fits of coughing, racers pose in the afternoon rays: Frank, Shad, Dan, Silver, Legs, and Lake.
Memoir, annmariemershon.com, Turkey, Istanbul, international teaching
Buy my memoir on teaching in Turkey
Britta's Journey, Ann Marie Mershon, emigration, Scandinavian, middle grade historical fiction
Buy a copy of Britta’s Journey,
a true emigration tale

 

angst, life in general

Angst of Another Sort

 

Though it’s clearly the last minute, I feel compelled to share some excerpts from a New Yorker article, “Trump’s Boswell Speaks” by Jane Mayer. It’s based on an interview with Tony Schwartz, the ghost writer who penned Trump’s autobiography, The Art of the Deal.

Excerpts from Mayer’s article:

“I put lipstick on a pig,” he (Schwartz) said. “I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is. I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility that it will lead to the end of civilization.”

“Trump didn’t fit any model of human being I’d ever met. He was obsessed with publicity, and he didn’t care what you wrote. Trump only takes two positions. Either you’re a scummy loser, liar, or whatever, or you’re the greatest. I became the greatest.”

Mayer continues:

He asked Trump to describe his childhood in detail. After sitting for only a few minutes in his suit and tie, Trump became impatient and irritable. Schwartz recalls, “like a kindergartener who can’t sit still in a classroom.” He regards Trump’s inability to concentrate as alarming in a presidential candidate. “If he had to be briefed on a crisis in the Situation Room, it’s impossible to imagine him paying attention over a long period of time,” he said.

“I seriously doubt that Trump has ever read a book straight through in his entire adult life.” During the eighteen months that he observed Trump, Schwartz said, he never saw a book on Trump’s desk, or elsewhere in his office, or in his apartment.

Schwartz says of Trump, “He lied strategically. He had a complete lack of conscience about it.” Since most people are “constrained by the truth,” Trump’s indifference to it “gave him a strange advantage.” When challenged about the facts, Schwartz said, Trump would often double down, repeat himself, and grow belligerent.

When writing the book, Schwartz concocted an artful euphemism. Writing in Trump’s voice, he explained to the reader, “I play to people’s fantasies…People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration–and it’s a very effective form of of promotion.

Schwartz now disavows the passage. “Deceit,” he told me, is never “innocent.” He added, ” ‘Truthful hyperbole’ is a contradiction in terms. It’s a way of saying, ‘It’s a lie, but who cares?’ ” Trump, he said, loves the phrase.

“People are dispensable and disposable in Trump’s world.” If Trump is elected president, he warned, “the millions of people who voted for him and believe that he represents their interests will learn what anyone who deals closely with him already knows–that he couldn’t care less about them.”